ni2o RapidTest

Countering COVID-19 with Our Five-Minute Test

Worldwide Testing Challenges

Currently, many communities are flying blind in their pandemic response. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports with the rise in global cases, COVID-19 continues to have a high transmission rate and a long incubation period, allowing it to spread quickly, often without symptoms.

With 20 million daily tests needed in the United States, current state-of-the-art tests are too slow, expensive, and require trained personnel. The sheer number of cases coupled with the lag in testing can overwhelm labs and hospitals, allowing the virus to spread undetected.

Robust Testing System

ni2o RapidTest is a comprehensive coronavirus detection system that is portable and non-invasive.
With deep integration and ease of use, ni2o RapidTest is a powerful tool in pandemic mitigation and management of future outbreaks.

Tests can be performed without trained professionals, reducing exposure

Personnel

Tests can be performed without trained professionals, reducing exposure

ni2o Rapid Test results are available within 5 minutes or less

Speed

Test results are available within 5 minutes or less

Non-invasive sample collection using saliva

Samples

Non-invasive sample collection using saliva

ni2o Rapid Test can be done at home, at a doctor’s office, or at schools and workplaces

Setting

Tests can be done at home, at a doctor’s office, or at schools and workplaces

Device can communicate results via USB, allowing rich integration

Integration

Device can communicate results via USB, allowing rich integration

The Need for Speed

Rapid testing for antibodies and viral load, detecting exposure, and assessing risk within minutes will provide benefits throughout the healthcare ecosystem.

ni2o RapidTest provides rapid and scalable screenings of populations to understand immunity and enable timely, sustainable national and global responses.

Flatten the Curve

Our test quickly produces results with high accuracy and detects exposure in asymptomatic carriers, patients who are visibly ill, and those who were infected with COVID-19 in the past. Easy and affordable in-home, school, and workplace testing allows for informed, effective self-isolation and quarantine protocols.

Want to learn more about our test?

Intellectual Property​
  • David S. Hage and William A. Clarke, “Microcolumn Chromatographic Immunoassays”, U.S. Patent 6,727,104 (Awarded 4/27/2004) and International Patent 02/077644 A1 (Awarded 3/10/2002)
  •  David S. Hage and William A. Clarke, “Loading Microcolumns for the Separation of Analytes from a Sample in the Millisecond Time Scale”, U.S. Patent 6,500,671 B2 (Awarded 12/31/2002)
  • David S. Hage and Hai Xuan, “Immobilization Method for Producing Active α1-Acid Glycoprotein”, U.S. Patent 7,575,908 (Awarded 9/18/2009)
  • David S. Hage and William A. Clarke, “Analysis of Free Analyte Fractions by Rapid Affinity Chromatography”, U.S. Patent Application U.S. 2002/0151086 A1 (Published 10/17/2002)
  • David S. Hage, Chunling Wa, Abby Jackson, and Hai Xuan, “Restricted Access Media and Methods for Making Restricted Access Media”, U.S. Patent 8,268,570 (Awarded 9/18/2012)
  • Newton Howard, “Virumeter for Rapid Detection Of COVID-19 and Other Pathogens”, U.S. Patent Application Number 16/847,625
  • Newton Howard, “System, Method, and Applications of Using the Fundamental Code Unit and Brain Language”, U.S. Patent 10,154,812 (Awarded 12/18/2019)
  • Newton Howard, “Fundamental Code Unit of the Brain: Photoreceptor Protein-Mediated Photonic Signaling within Neural Tissue and Its Uses in Brain Co-Processor”, U.S. Patent Application Number 15/988,292 (Published 10/11/2018)
  • Newton Howard, “Fundamental Code Unit of the Brain: Towards a New Model for Cognitive Geometry”, U.S. Patent Application Number 62/515,133 (Published 10/11/2018)
References - David Hage​
  1. Beeram SR, Zheng X, Suh K, Hage DS. Characterization of solution-phase drug-protein interactions by ultrafast affinity extraction. Methods. 2018;146:46-57.
  2. Clarke W, Schiel JE, Moser A, Hage DS. Analysis of free hormone fractions by an ultrafast immunoextraction/displacement immunoassay: studies using free thyroxine as a model system. Anal Chem. 2005;77(6):1859-1866.
  3. Hage DS. Survey of recent advances in analytical applications of immunoaffinity chromatography. J Chromatogr B Biomed Sci Appl. 1998;715(1):3-28.
  4. Hage DS, Ruhn PF. An Introduction to Affinity Chromatography. Vol 92. (Hage DS, ed.). CRC Press Boca Raton, FL; 2006:3-13.
  5. Matsuda R, Rodriguez E, Suresh D, Hage DS. Chromatographic immunoassays: strategies and recent developments in the analysis of drugs and biological agents. Bioanalysis. 2015;7(22):2947-2966.
  6. Moser AC, Hage DS. Immunoaffinity chromatography: an introduction to applications and recent developments. Bioanalysis. 2010;2(4):769-790.
  7. Ohnmacht CM, Schiel JE, Hage DS. Analysis of free drug fractions using near-infrared fluorescent labels and an ultrafast immunoextraction/displacement assay. Anal Chem. 2006;78(21):7547-7556.
  8. Pfaunmiller EL, Anguizola JA, Milanuk ML, Carter N, Hage DS. Use of protein G microcolumns in chromatographic immunoassays: A comparison of competitive binding formats. J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2016;1021:91-100
  9. Zhang C, Woolfork AG, Suh K, et al. Clinical and pharmaceutical applications of affinity ligands in capillary electrophoresis: A review. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2020;177:112882. 
  10. Zhang C, Woolfork AG, Suh K, et al. Clinical and pharmaceutical applications of affinity ligands in capillary electrophoresis: A review. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2020;177:112882
Other References
  1. Do J, Ahn CH. A polymer lab-on-a-chip for magnetic immunoassay with on-chip sampling and detection capabilities. Lab Chip. 2008;8(4):542-549.
  2. Guo L, Ren L, Yang S, et al. Profiling Early Humoral Response to Diagnose Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19). Clin Infect Dis. Published online March 21, 2020. doi:10.1093/cid/ciaa310
  3. Hettegger P, Huber J, Paßecker K, et al. High similarity of IgG antibody profiles in blood and saliva opens opportunities for saliva based serology. PLoS One. 2019;14(6):e0218456.
  4. Hodinka RL, Nagashunmugam T, Malamud D. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus antibodies in oral fluids. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 1998;5(4):419-426.
  5. Lee JE, Seo JH, Kim CS, et al. A comparative study on antibody immobilization strategies onto solid surface. Korean J Chem Eng. 2013;30(10):1934-1938.
  6. Ma H, Zeng W, He H, et al. COVID-19 diagnosis and study of serum SARS-CoV-2 specific IgA, IgM and IgG by chemiluminescence immunoanalysis. Infectious Diseases (except HIV/AIDS). Published online April 22, 2020. doi:10.1101/2020.04.17.20064907
  7. Okba NMA, Muller MA, Li W, et al. SARS-CoV-2 specific antibody responses in COVID-19 patients. Infectious Diseases (except HIV/AIDS). Published online March 20, 2020. doi:10.1101/2020.03.18.20038059
  8. Schramm W, Angulo GB, Torres PC, Burgess-Cassler A. A simple saliva-based test for detecting antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 1999;6(4):577-580.
  9. Tsekenis G, Chatzipetrou M, Massaouti M, Zergioti I. Comparative Assessment of Affinity-Based Techniques for Oriented Antibody Immobilization towards Immunosensor Performance Optimization. Journal of Sensors. 2019;2019. doi:10.1155/2019/6754398
  10. Zhu H, Fohlerová Z, Pekárek J, Basova E, Neužil P. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip technologies for viral diagnosis. Biosens Bioelectron. 2020;153:112041.